2008 - Tenth Anniversary Celebration, Part I


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Volume 10, No. 1 - Fall 2008 Issue #19 - Tenth Anniversary Celebration, Part I

Preface: Our Tenth Anniversary Year - Chris Matthew Sciabarra, p. 1

MIND, INTROSPECTION, AND "THE OBJECTIVE", pp. 3-84

ROGER E. BISSELL

In this sequel to his essay "Ayn Rand and 'The Objective'" (JARS, Fall 2007), the author warns against "the seduction of 'the basic'" and uses ideas by Efron, Peikoff, and Aristotle to argue that introspection and mental data (including mind) are objective and that causal efficacy of mind and mind-body interaction only make sense if mind is conceived of not as an attribute, but as an entity (viz., the conscious human brain). None of this, however, implies Epiphenomenalism or that consciousness is irrelevant to human history.

THE PEIKOVIAN DOCTRINE OF THE ARBITRARY ASSERTION, pp. 85-170

ROBERT L. CAMPBELL

The doctrine of the arbitrary assertion is a key part of Objectivist epistemology as elaborated by Leonard Peikoff. For Peikoff, assertions unsupported by evidence are neither true nor false; they have no context or place in the hierarchy of conceptual knowledge; they are meaningless and paralyze rational cognition; their production is proof of irrationality. A thorough examination of the doctrine reveals worrisomely unclear standards of evidence and a jumble of contradictory claims about which assertions are arbitrary, when they are arbitrary, and what ought to be done about them when they are. A wholesale rejection of the doctrine is recommended.

ECONOMIC DECISION-MAKING AND ETHICAL CHOICE, pp. 171-91

KATHLEEN TOUCHSTONE

Some economists, notably Gary Becker, claim that economic analysis is applicable to any decision, ethical or otherwise. Ethical principles within Objectivist Ethics are based on long-range success life being the measure of success. This paper examines these different approaches to decision-making. Decision theory and Rand's Benevolent Universe Premise form the basis for the analysis.

REVIEWS


RE-READING ATLAS SHRUGGED, pp. 193-205

J. H. HUEBERT

Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged: A Philosophical and Literary Companion, a new book edited by Edward W. Younkins, provides a reminder of how much Rand's great novel has to say on a broad range of subjects and of what a joy the book has been for so many to read. This review summarizes and comments on the book's essays.

PLATO, ARISTOTLE, RAND, AND SEXUALITY, pp. 207-17

FRED SEDDON

This essay offers a critical review of Robert Mayhew's translation of Plato: Laws 10, Chris Matthew Sciabarra's monograph, Ayn Rand, Homosexuality, and Human Liberation, and Roderick T. Long's monograph, Reason and Value: Aristotle versus Rand. Seddon finds especially questionable Long's treatment of Plato.

DISCUSSION

REPLY TO FRED SEDDON INTERPRETING PLATO'S DIALOGUES: ARISTOTLE VERSUS SEDDON, pp. 219-29

RODERICK T. LONG

In reply to Seddon's charge that Long's analysis in Reason and Value rests on a mistaken reading of Plato, Long both defends his interpretation of Plato and argues that nothing in Reason and Value depends on Plato interpretation in any case.

REJOINDER TO RODERICK T. LONG - LONG ON INTERPRETATION, pp. 231-33

FRED SEDDON

In this essay, Seddon provides a brief rejoinder to Long's reply to his review of the monograph Reason and Value: Aristotle versus Rand. Despite his criticisms, Seddon maintains that reading Long's monograph will pay rewards for all those interested in the history of philosophy as it impacts Ayn Rand's thought.

REPLY TO PETER E. VEDDER, "SELF-DIRECTEDNESS AND THE HUMAN GOOD" (FALL 2007) DEFENDING NORMS OF LIBERTY, pp. 235-38

DOUGLAS J. DEN UYL AND DOUGLAS B. RASMUSSEN

This essay is a response to Peter E. Vedder's Fall 2007 review of the authors' book, Norms of Liberty: A Perfectionist Basis for Non-Perfectionist Politics. Vedder argues that the authors 1) have a Kantian notion of self-directedness, and 2) are inconsistent in the application of their philosophical anthropology to their view of political liberty. In denying both claims, the authors assert that Vedder both fails to define certain terms and holds them to positions they do not accept.

REJOINDER TO DOUGLAS J. DEN UYL AND DOUGLAS B. RASMUSSEN DIFFICULTIES IN NORMS OF LIBERTY, pp. 239-42

PETER E. VEDDER

This rejoinder is a reply to the authors' criticisms of Vedder's original review of Norms of Liberty that seeks to clarify why the difficulties present in their attempt to establish the modern right to liberty on the foundation of Greek nobility and Aristotelian eudaemonism are insuperable.

Volume 9, No. 2 - Spring 2008 Issue #18

COMPLETING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF AYN RAND'S ATLAS SHRUGGED AT ITS FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY, pp. 191 - 219
DAVID N. MAYER

In 1961, Ayn Rand called for "a moral revolution to sanction and complete the political achievement of the American Revolution." Through her novel Atlas Shrugged and the philosophy it presents, Rand shows what must be done to complete the unfinished American Revolution. This essay, written to commemorate the book’s fiftieth anniversary, discusses the historical background necessary to understand how Atlas Shrugged accomplishes this purpose. It explains how and why the Revolution was incomplete, focusing on the law’s failure to fully protect the rights of businessmen‚ and suggests how to achieve the "moral revolution" needed to complete the Founders’ work.

RAND AND MACINTYRE ON MORAL AGENCY, pp. 221¬243

RON BEADLE

This paper contrasts the work of Ayn Rand and Alasdair MacIntyre on moral agency. Both argue that moral agency requires the application of a consistent moral code across relationships with others and that such consistency is rarely evident in the modern social order. However, while MacIntyre holds this failure to be a defining feature of the modern social order, Rand holds this to be a failure of individuals and a marker of a wider cultural confusion. While Rand sees selfishness and capitalism as the means to overcome individual and institutional "mixed premises," MacIntyre condemns both.

RAND ON HUME'S MORAL SKEPTICISM, pp. 245 - 251

TIBOR R. MACHAN

This brief discussion argues that Ayn Rand misconstrued David Hume's famous "is/ought" gap, just as innumerable others have. Hume objected to deducing ought claims (or judgments or statements) from is claims and not to deriving the former from the latter. He was silent about this but his own work in ethics and politics suggests that he would agree that one can infer ethical, moral or political beliefs from an understanding of facts (such as those of history).

TOWARD THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PARADIGM OF HUMAN FLOURISHING IN A FREE SOCIETY, pp. 253 - 304

EDWARD W. YOUNKINS

This essay presents a skeleton of a potential conceptual framework for human flourishing in a free society. Its aim is to present a diagram that illustrates the ways in which its topics relate to one another and why they do. It argues for a plan of conceptualization rather than for the topics themselves. It emphasizes the interconnections among the components of the schema presented. It sees an essential interconnection between objective concepts, arguing that all of the disciplines of human action can be integrated into a paradigm of human flourishing based on the nature of man and the world.

MISSING THE MARK: SALSMAN'S REVIEW OF THE GREAT DEPRESSION, pp. 305- 339

LARRY SECHREST

Objectivist Richard Salsman has recently offered a provocative commentary on business cycles in general and on the Great Depression in particular. The present paper closely examines Salsman’s essay, with special attention given to his condemnation of Austrian business cycle theory. It demonstrates that Salsman’s account of the Great Depression is confused and inadequate, because it is riddled with both factual errors and misunderstandings. Moreover, his attack on Austrian economists is indefensible. Indeed, he is not even reliably able to recognize their theory when it is laid before him.

REVIEWS AND DISCUSSION

DEFENDING ADVERTISING, pp. 341 - 349

JULIUSZ JABLECKI

Jerry Kirkpatrick’s book, In Defense of Advertising, is an intellectually stimulating and enjoyable read that combines a Randian philosophical framework with Misesian economics to provide a solid defense of advertising as an essential element of free market economy.

REPLY TO JULIUSZ JABLECKI: THE CONNECTION BETWEEN ADVERTISING AND OBJECTIVIST EPISTEMOLOGY, pp. 351 - 555

JERRY KIRKPATRICK

Kirkpatrick responds to "minor shortcomings" discussed in Juliusz Jablecki’s review of In Defense of Advertising ("Defending Advertising"). The main issue is the need to delve deeply into the Objectivist ethics and epistemology in order to defend the very applied and concrete discipline of advertising. Kirkpatrick expands on this need and then briefly addresses additional minor complaints mentioned in the generally positive review.

REJOINDER TO JERRY KIRKPATRICK: ADVERTISING, CAPITALISM, AND CHRISTIANITY, pp. 357 - 360

JULIUSZ JABLECKI

Jerry Kirkpatrick’s reply ("The Connection between Advertising and Objectivist Epistemology") to Juliusz Jablecki’s review of his book, In Defense of Advertising, does address most of the criticisms raised therein. Nevertheless, Kirkpatrick’s account of the views of Ludwig von Mises, and his own opinion of the relationship between Christianity and capitalism, remain one-sided and incomplete.

DISCUSSION

REPLY TO STEPHEN E. PARRISH AND PATRICK TONER: NOT EVEN FALSE: A COMMENTARY ON PARRISH AND TONER, pp. 361 - 394

ADAM REED

In Ayn Rand’s philosophical perspective, and in the working epistemology of science, claims, about which there is no knowledge originating in the evidence of the senses, are considered in the words of physicist Wolfgang Paulin “not even false." Theistic arguments presented in The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies by Parrish and Toner are in this category. Various claims to which Parrish and Toner refer are shown to come from misuse of intuition, middle-school fallacies about probability, and attempts to deduce the existence of a god from temporary (and for the most part already closed) gaps in scientific knowledge.

REJOINDER TO ADAM REED: WHAT'S GOOD FOR THE GOOSE AND RELATED MATTERS, pp. 395 - 415

STEPHEN E. PARRISH

This is a response to Adam Reed’s critique ("Not Even False," The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, Spring 2008) of Parrish’s essay, "God and Objectivism" (The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, Spring 2007). Parrish argues that Reed ignores most of his critical points with regard to Objectivism, while committing several fallacies and embracing his own arbitrary positions.

REJOINDER TO ADAM REED: GOD-TALK AND THE ARBITRARY, pp. 417 - 421

PATRICK TONER

In this brief note, Toner discusses Adam Reed’s reply ("Not Even False," The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, Spring 2008) to his earlier paper, "Objectivist Atheology" (The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, Spring 2007). He argues that Reed’s criticisms do not hold up under scrutiny..



2008


CONTRIBUTOR BIOGRAPHIES

Volume 10, No. 1 - Fall 2008 Issue #19

ROGER E. BISSELL


is a professional musician and a writer on psychology and philosophy. His work has appeared in a number of other publications, including Reason Papers, Objectivity, Journal of Consciousness Studies, Bulletin of the Association for Psychological Type, Vera Lex, and ART Ideas. Roger's trombone playing is featured on jazz CDs released in December 2003 and July 2006 .

ROBERT L. CAMPBELL

Is a Professor of Psychology at Clemson University, Brackett Hall 410A, Clemson SC 29634-1355 USA; Dr. Campbell's most recent publications are "An Interactivist-Hermeneutic Metatheory for Positive Psychology" (with John Chambers Christopher, in Theory & Psychology) and "When the train left the station, with two lights on behind: The Eddie Willers story" in Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged: A Philosophical and Literary Companion (edited by Edward W. Younkins and published by Ashgate). His chapter on "Constructive process: Abstraction, generalization, and dialectics" is forthcoming in The Cambridge Companion to Piaget (edited by Ulrich Muller, Leslie Smith, and Jeremy Carpendale).

DOUGLAS J. DEN UYL

Vice President of Education, Liberty Fund, Inc., 8335 Allison Pointe Trail, Suite 300, Indianapolis, Indiana 46250-1687, is formerly Professor of Philosophy and Department Chair at Bellarmine University. He has published books and articles in ethics and political theory as well as in the area of the history of philosophy. He co-edited, with Douglas B. Rasmussen, The Philosophic Thought of Ayn Rand, and recently published The Fountainhead: An American Novel. He is coauthor, with Douglas B. Rasmussen, of Norms of Liberty: A Perfectionist Basis for Non-Perfectionist Politics, and author of God, Man, and Well-Being (Peter Lang, 2008).

J. H. HUEBERT

is an Adjunct Professor of Law at Ohio Northern University College of Law, an adjunct faculty member of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, and a practicing attorney. He received his juris doctor from the University of Chicago Law School and his B.A. in economics from Grove City College. His articles have appeared in numerous scholarly, professional, and popular publications.

RODERICK T. LONG

Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy, 6080 Haley Center, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849, A.B. Harvard 1985, Ph.D. Cornell 1992, is the author of Reason and Value: Aristotle versus Rand (The Objectivist Center, 2000) and Wittgenstein, Austrian Economics, and the Logic of Action: Praxeological Investigations (Routledge, forthcoming 2009), as well as co-editor (with Tibor R. Machan) of Anarchism/Minarchism: Is a Government Part of a Free Country? (Ashgate, 2008). He runs a fledgling think tank, the Molinari Institute ; blogs at Austro-Athenian Empire ; and is active in the Alliance of the Libertarian Left . He is also a co-editor of The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies.

DOUGLAS B. RASMUSSEN

Professor of Philosophy, Department of Philosophy, St. John's University, 8000 Utopia Parkway, Jamaica, New York 11439, is coauthor (with Douglas J. Den Uyl) of Norms of Liberty: A Perfectionist Basis for Non-Perfectionist Politics (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2005).

FRED SEDDON

currently holds adjunct professorships at three universities in South Western Pennsylvania. He has been president of the West Virginia Philosophical Society since 1988 and is an associate member of the Center for the Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh. He is an international scholar and the author of over 140 books, articles, book reviews and speeches, including such works as Ayn Rand, Objectivists and the History of Philosophy, An Introduction to the Philosophical Works of F. S. C. Northrop, and Aristotle and Lukasiewicz on the Principle of Contradiction.

KATHLEEN TOUCHSTONE

Assistant Professor of Economics, Sorrell College of Business, Troy University Montgomery, Montgomery, Alabama 36103, author of Then Athena Said: Unilateral, Transfers and the Transformation of Objectivist Ethics, published by University Press of America, 2006.

PETER E. VEDDER

is an independent scholar of seventeenth-century philosophy currently working on the problem of the infinite in Descartes' Third Meditation.

Volume 9, No. 2 - Spring 2008 Issue #18

RON BEADLE

Principal Lecturer in Organisation and Human Resource Management, Newcastle Business School, University of Northumbria, City Campus East, Newcastle upon Tyne England NE1 8ST; has written on Ayn Rand and Elliott Jaques with Martyn Dyer-Smith in The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies (vol. 3, no. 1) and published book chapters and journal articles on undertaking empirics using MacIntyre's 'goods, virtues, practices, institutions' framework in Organisation Studies (with Geoff Moore), Philosophy of Management, Tamara (Post-Modern Journal of Critical Organisation Science), and Culture and Organisation (with David Konyot).

JULIUSZ JABLECKI

is a graduate student at the Faculty of Economic Sciences, Warsaw University, Poland, and a board member with the Polish Ludwig von Mises Institute.

JERRY KIRKPATRICK

, is professor of international business and marketing at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. His latest work is Montessori, Dewey, and Capitalism: Educational Theory for a Free Market in Education. Kirkpatrick holds a B.A. degree in philosophy from the University of Denver and M.B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in marketing from Baruch College of the City University of New York. His research interests focus on the philosophic, economic, and psychological foundations of marketing, advertising, and education. He posts essays monthly on his blog.

TIBOR R. MACHAN

holds the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School of Business & Economics, Chapman University, Orange, California 29866. He is also a research fellow of the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, California. His most recent book is The Morality of Business: A Profession for Human Wealthcare (Springer, 2007).

DAVID N. MAYER

Is professor of law and history at Capital University in Columbus, Ohio. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Virginia in 1988 and a J.D. from the University of Michigan in 1980. He is the author of The Constitutional Thought of Thomas Jefferson (University of Virginia Press, 1994) as well as numerous articles published in history, law, and political science journals.

STEPHEN E. PARRISH, Ph.D.

is associate professor of philosophy and librarian at Concordia University in Ann Arbor. He is the author of God and Necessity (University Press of America, 2001), and the coauthor of See the gods Fall (College Press, 1997) and The Mormon Concept of God (Edwin Mellen, 1991). He is writing (very slowly) a book on the mind-body problem.

ADAM REED

Professor of Information Systems, California State University, Los Angeles, California 90032-8123, studied electrical engineering, computer science and neurophysiology as an undergraduate and graduate student at MIT. He completed his doctorate in mathematical psychology at the University of Oregon and did postdoctoral research in neural networks at Rockefeller University. Before joining the faculty of Cal State LA, he spent 18 years at Bell Labs, working in artificial intelligence and in software engineering. He is the author of more than 20 research articles, book chapters and patents in electronics, computer science, neurophysiology, mathematical and cognitive psychology, economics, scientific methodology and epistemology, politics, political history and the history of ideas.

LARRY J. SECHREST

is Professor of Economics and Director of the Free Enterprise Institute at Sul Ross State University in Alpine, Texas. He is a Foundation Scholar with the Foundation for the Advancement of Monetary Education in New York City, a Research Fellow with The Independent Institute in Oakland, California, and an Adjunct Scholar with the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama. He serves as a member of the Editorial Boards of the Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics, The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, and the ICFAI Journal of Public Finance. Furthermore, Sechrest is the author of Free Banking: Theory, History, and a Laissez-Faire Model (1993) as well as numerous articles in periodical publications such as the Cato Journal, the Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics, the Journal of Economics, The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, the South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences, Advances in Austrian Economics, The Independent Review, the Review of Austrian Economics, Reason Papers, the ICFAI Journal of Public Finance, The Freeman, Ideas on Liberty, The Free Radical, Liberty, the Review of Business, the Journal of Services Marketing, and in reference works such as The Myth of National Defense; Fifteen Great Austrian Economists; Philosophers of Capitalism: Menger, Mises, Rand, and Beyond; Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged: A Philosophical and Literary Companion; and Magill's Survey of Social Science: Economics.

PATRICK TONER

Department of Philosophy, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27100, works in metaphysics and philosophy of religion, and has published previously in journals such as Philosophical Studies, The Philosophical Quarterly, and Faith and Philosophy. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Notre Dame's Center for Philosophy of Religion before coming to Wake Forest.

EDWARD W. YOUNKINS

Professor, Department of Business, Wheeling Jesuit University, 316 Washington Avenue, Wheeling, West Virginia, 26003, is the author of numerous articles in accounting and business journals. In addition, his many free-market-oriented articles and reviews have appeared in a variety of publications. He is the author of Capitalism and Commerce: Conceptual Foundations of Free Enterprise (Lexington Books, 2002). He is the editor of Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged: A Philosophical and Literary Companion (Ashgate, 2007). His newest book is Champions of a Free Society: Ideas of Capitalism's Philosophers and Economists (Lexington Books, 2008).